Apple built a 32-inch 6K Retina display for the Mac Pro

It's important to have a well informed opinion about the technology you're buying.

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Apple didn’t just have a new Mac Pro to show at WWDC — the company has unveiled a 32-inch Retina 6K display, the Pro Display XDR, to match. The screen matches the industrial look of the Mac Pro and delivers the kind of color performance you’d expect, including support for the P3 color space and extremely accurate high dynamic range. Also, glare might not be an issue — Apple has ditched the usual anti-reflection coating by etching the glass itself with a “nano-texture,” and it touts both a 1,000-nit typical brightness and a 1,600-nit peak. The 1,000,000-to-1 contrast ratio will help produce deep blacks, too.

The design isn’t just for looks. Apple finally has a stand that supports rotation into portrait mode, and the cheese grater-style vents on the back help it stay cool and quiet. There’s logically Thunderbolt 3 on the back, and you can daisy chain up to six of the panels on the new Mac Pro. That’s about 120 million pixels, if you’re counting.

Be ready to raid your bank account when the Pro Display XDR arrives in the fall, though. It’ll start at $4,999, and a model with the nano-texture glass will cost you $5,999. That’s not including the $999 you’ll want for the Pro Stand, or $199 if you’re going to use a VESA mount. Apple is pitching this as a lower-cost alternative to reference grade monitors that normally cost tens of thousands of dollars, rather than something you’d buy for everyday use. It’s a bargain in that regard, but Apple is clearly leaving the more affordable options to third parties.

Source: engadget.com